Surprisingly, Facebook is an excellent app for getting laid. It can do a lot of stuff. You can view local events that you and your friends are interested in. That makes it a good for meeting people. Once you meet people, friend them on Facebook and then use Facebook Messenger to talk to them. You have the benefit of knowing their identity fairly quickly and while their apps are bloated, at least Facebook's apps are free. There are tons of dating sites and hook up apps out there. Most of them still don't have as high of a success rate as being introduced to new people through your friends. The tools are there if you choose to use them.
I was on Clover for quite some time but had forgotten it even existed until I started to throw this list together. I felt like it was a less successful hybrid of OkCupid and Tinder, and I also felt like the user base was pretty small, even though I live in an urban area with plenty of people who use a wide variety of dating apps. Clover says it has nearly 6 million users, 85 percent of whom are between the ages of 18 and 30.
Pure is the free hookup app for awesome people.  It is a hookup app for exciting people who are searching for adventures, not relationships.  The app is easy to use, quick, direct and discreet.  With Pure your private life stays private because there are no social media links and no email addresses.  Create a profile, upload a selfie and begin searching for matches for free.  Once you find a match, the free chat lets you get to know them a little better before meeting for your adventure.
Wild promises it’s “the fastest way to meet and date with hot singles nearby.” Founded in 2016, the app is available for free via iTunes and Google Play, where it has a 4.5 and 5 star rating, respectively. More than 65% of members have been verified by the Wild team that they are who they say they are, and you can filter them by their gender, age, location and distance, intention, interests, ethnicity, body type, height, and the last time they logged in.
As the polar ice caps melt and the earth churns through the Sixth Extinction, another unprecedented phenomenon is taking place, in the realm of sex. Hookup culture, which has been percolating for about a hundred years, has collided with dating apps, which have acted like a wayward meteor on the now dinosaur-like rituals of courtship. “We are in uncharted territory” when it comes to Tinder et al., says Justin Garcia, a research scientist at Indiana University’s Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction. “There have been two major transitions” in heterosexual mating “in the last four million years,” he says. “The first was around 10,000 to 15,000 years ago, in the agricultural revolution, when we became less migratory and more settled,” leading to the establishment of marriage as a cultural contract. “And the second major transition is with the rise of the Internet.”
With networks like Tinder (along with Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and others), the size of the user base is always critical to success. Yet with Tinder it was perhaps even more important—since the app is location-based, it’s of very little use without a sufficient quantity of potential matches. In a town with only 100 or so users, the fun would last one or two sessions at most before potential matches had been exhausted. After all, no matter how fun or engaging the UX, a dating site without potential matches isn’t very useful. This is where the collegiate greek system played a pivotal, dual role in growth. Not only was it a rich group of target users to effectively seed supply from, it also had existing dense networks to increase the number of people on the platform in one area quickly. After a couple of sororities started using the app, the word of mouth between the sorority and fraternity houses of that campus would take over, instantaneously increasing the availability of potential matches for users in that area. We’ve talked before about how constraints to the size of the network helped companies like Facebook, Uber and Belly create liquidity in their network. Tinder used the same strategy, but rather than setting their sites on geographic areas (such as cities in Uber’s case) they used the Greek system to both fuel supply and drive network density. Once Tinder had gained a sufficient user base thanks to word of mouth, adoption began to snowball thanks to the network effect—the more users Tinder got, the more valuable it became, and so even more people joined.
A Facebook account and cell phone number are required to set up a Tinder account. Once you’re on and specify what gender you’re interested in matching with, the app lets you upload up to six photos and write a short paragraph about yourself. You also have the option to link your Spotify account so potential matches can see what kind of music you like, or your Instagram account if you’d like to display even more photos. The whole setup process took our reviewers about three minutes and was far less comprehensive than sites like eharmony and Plenty of Fish.
Constantly right-swiping to game the system is a bad idea. Swiping right indiscriminately just means you'll match with people you may not be interested in, which is annoying for them and you, wasting their time and clogging up your messages. Swipe right only on those you genuinely hope to match with so that when you see that coveted, "Congratulations! It's a match!" alert, it actually means something. Not only that, but new iterations of the app penalize indiscriminate swipers, so you're better off being choosy.

Apps like Tinder and Bumble are technically for all sexual orientations — so why are they still giving you male matches when you've specified you only want women? Swiping through all of that is way too much work, and it shouldn't have to be like that. LESBIANS EXIST. Claiming to the be the app that "introduces you to every lesbian you've ever wanted to meet," HER is the award-winning mix of dating and social media that lets you meet girls you know are girls, as it requires a Facebook for signup and is solely for lesbian, bisexual, and queer women. It was also created by queer women, for queer women, which is glorious. 

The comparison to online shopping seems an apt one. Dating apps are the free-market economy come to sex. The innovation of Tinder was the swipe—the flick of a finger on a picture, no more elaborate profiles necessary and no more fear of rejection; users only know whether they’ve been approved, never when they’ve been discarded. OkCupid soon adopted the function. Hinge, which allows for more information about a match’s circle of friends through Facebook, and Happn, which enables G.P.S. tracking to show whether matches have recently “crossed paths,” use it too. It’s telling that swiping has been jocularly incorporated into advertisements for various products, a nod to the notion that, online, the act of choosing consumer brands and sex partners has become interchangeable.
In another recent study, by Sindy Sumter and colleagues, a sample of 163 Dutch Tinder users rated the extent to which various motives described their reasons for using Tinder.2​ The researchers then used a statistical technique to group those ratings into general categories. The categories, and the average ratings of the participants for each category, are summarized in the table below.
Unlike apps like Tinder and Feeld, Wild allows you to be completely anonymous online because there’s no social log-in required. Another advantage of this app is that it has verified profiles means that you can trust your date is going to look the same as his or her photos. Most hook-up casual dating apps users have hectic schedules. To deal with that, Wild comes with filters to help you save time by immediately stating what you’re looking for. Furthermore, when you lock in on your potential matches for the night, the Wild app allows you to hide your account from any other user. This feature not only ensures you are isolated to your picks, but also that others don’t waste their time looking into you when you’re not interested. And if that is not enough, Wild users can chat for free, so that they cannot only meet up for the night but even get to know each other beforehand. If you like knowing a little about a partner before spending the night with them, Wild may be the app you need.
Who it's for: Picky people looking for something super specific in a partner. And guys, this is not the place for the younger millennials: EliteSingles loves to brag that 82% of their members are college grads, and with most of its members being 33-50 years old, we can pretty surely say that the main target is mature, working professionals rather than the the Tinder-using generation. Sorry college kids.
The gist: Hinge gives the modern feel and no-patience-required matching like Tinder, but with the relationship (rather than hookup) mindset that sites like eharmony or Match offer. Pretty much everyone is on the same page and knows that that this app isn't for sex, but there's no pressure to rush into marriage either. It's chill, it's legit, and traditional swiping apps should be worried.
OkCupid has as many downsides as Tinder, and fewer positive ones, with the exception of learning a lot more about your potential dating partners. The interface is extremely clunky and the photos are a little small. You also have to tap on a user’s small image to see a larger version and the person’s profile, which is simply too large for an app. It works on a website, but it’s overkill on an app, and the amount of scrolling required makes it annoying to access. When you exit back to the list, there’s no guarantee that it’ll be in the same order or that it will return you to the spot you scrolled down to, making it extremely hard to keep track of what you’ve already viewed.
×