You can find the Elite Singles app in the App Store and on Google Play, and you won’t have to pay anything to download it, upload your information and photos, search through profiles, receive matches via an exclusive algorithm, and communicate in certain ways (e.g., send virtual winks). In addition to the lack of cost, Elite Singles is highly respected, particularly because over 80% of its members have a higher education degree such as a bachelor’s or master’s.
The location-based dating app Tinder was founded on September 1st, 2012, and launched the following October out of Hatch Labs, IAC’s “innovation sandbox.” IAC is the parent company that owns much of Tinder. Since the launch, the Tinder app has become a phenomenon. By January 2014, the app boasted more than 10 million users. [1] By December of 2014, the app had been downloaded more than 40 million times with users swiping 1 billion times per day. [23] On February 3rd, during the IAC earnings call, the company reported that Tinder saw 100% year over year growth in monthly active users (MAU). [24] Like many things with Tinder, it’s valuation is one that’s part myth and part truth. In the Spring of 2014, several sources reported that IAC dropped $500 million to buy another 10% of Tinder from Chamath Palihapitiya—valuing the company at $5 billion. Not long after the story was picked up, Tinder CEO, Sean Rad cited the report as “meaningfully incorrect,” [15] while estimates from Re/Code put the value of the company at the time at $550 million. [25] Later in 2014, rumors were swirling about additional investment in Tinder at $1 billion or more. [26] However, in December, IAC Chairman and Senior Executive Barry Diller reported that the valuation is irrelevant because the company is not a venture backed startup. [27] Beyond its breakout success in the highly-competitive dating space, Tinder has made waves both as a pioneer for mobile user experience (with it’s swiping paradigm) and via its sordid upper management scandal. In this growth study we’re going to focus on the growth engine that made the company so successful and leave a deep dive into the management scandal and sexual harassment lawsuit—that forced their CMO and co-founder Justin Mateen to resign and early employee Whitney Wolfe to leave—for other sites with much deeper journalistic and investigative chops. If you want to read more on the turmoil on the management team and lawsuits read more here. But in a world of heavily funded and popular services like Match.com, Plenty of Fish, eHarmony and others, how did this upstart breakout and totally reinvent online dating for the mobile-first set? In this growth study we’ll look at:
Ever heard of "behavioral matchmaking?" Well, you have now. Zoosk sports a flirty "pick up and go" philosophy when it comes to online dating, so they won't make you answer a torturous string of questions about yourself. Instead, Zoosk monitors your on-site activity and attempts to give you better matches based on what you already like. Zoosk offers ease and practicality and is pretty far from the Tinders of the world.

None of the swiping apps purport to be as scientific as the original online dating services, like Match, eHarmony, or OkCupid, which require in-depth profiles and ask users to answer questions about religion, sex, politics, lifestyle choices, and other highly personal topics. This can make Tinder and its ilk read as insufficient hot-or-not-style apps, but it’s useful to remember that there’s no proof that a more complicated matchmaking algorithm is a better one. In fact, there’s a lot of proof that it’s not.
I think there’s a generational gap. I see a lot of people in their 30s using apps, but I see a lot of people in their early 20s actually engaging with each other. There’s a bad luck table here. I won’t tell you which one it is, but all the bad dates happen there. There’s this one regular here who makes maps of the bar with his Tinder dates, like a little bonding exercise. But he does it with every one of them, drawing the bar and trying to figure out who else is on a Tinder date.
POF, aka Plenty of Fish, takes its name from that old dating adage “There are plenty of fish in the sea.” POF boasts an “advanced matching algorithm” and lets you view your matches for free. By the end of 2014, POF anticipates they will have 90 million users. If the POF app is the sea in this analogy, then there are definitely plenty of “fish” in it. This free dating app is a great way to find singles for long-term relationships or casual dates.
We can also guess that the algorithm rewards pickiness and disincentivizes people to swipe right too much. You’re limited to 100 right swipes per day in Tinder, to make sure you’re actually looking at profiles and not just spamming everyone to rack up random matches. Tinder obviously cares about making matches, but it cares more about the app feeling useful and the matches feeling real — as in, resulting in conversation and, eventually, dates. It tracks when users exchange phone numbers and can pretty much tell which accounts are being used to make real-life connections and which are used to boost the ego of an over-swiper. If you get too swipe-happy, you may notice your number of matches goes down, as Tinder serves your profile to fewer other users.
In March 2014, Media & Internet conglomerate IAC increased its majority stake in Tinder, a move that caused speculation that the valuation of Tinder was at several billion dollars.[16] In July 2015, Bank of America Merrill Lynch valued Tinder at $1.35 billion, based upon an estimate of $27 per user on an estimated user base of 50 million, with an additional bullish-estimate of $3 billion by taking the average of the IPOs of similar companies. Analysts also estimated that Tinder had about half a million paid users within its userbase that consisted mostly of free users.[57] The monetization of the site has come through leaving the basic app free, and then adding different in-app purchase options for additional functions.[13] In January 2015 Tinder acquired Chill, the developers of Tappy—a mobile messenger that uses "images and ephemerality".[58]
An advanced matching algorithm based not only on your preferences specified manually but also on your recently viewed profiles. It means the app shows results based on your clicks too, not only by specified criteria. For example, if you say you are looking for a 30-year old fitness instructor but view profiles of 40+ businessmen – the search will show you both;
Sometimes, half the battle of finding a willing hookup buddy involves proximity. Even when you're filtering through matches that are extremely close to you, the inconveniences of city transportation can thwart your best efforts at sealing the deal. Enter Happn, an app that connects matches based on the places you both frequent (the gimmick being that you both could have, if the timing were right, passed one another on the street at some point without knowing it). While this isn't strictly a hookup app, taking advantage of a platform that curates your matches based on locations that you frequent makes for a convenient way to facilitate meeting somewhere that's centrally located and convenient for both of you.
That having been said, using an app to get lucky also has its downsides. Putting out feelers for a casual hookup to strangers you haven't met yet can get dicey fairly quickly. Figuring out the right approach can take some time, too. You want to make your intentions known, but you need to do so in a way that doesn't come off too strong or make her feel uncomfortable. You'll need to exchange a few messages to see if you two are feeling each other, but you don't want to become pen pals with someone you're just trying to get it on with, either.
Here's how it works: Your nosey friend will sign you up for the app and then starts promoting you like they're a damn salesman. When they find someone they deem fit, they'll swipe right. If the potential match's wingman agrees, you and your blind date will be automatically connected, and the helpful friends are booted from the conversation. There's even a leader board for multiple friends to compete to see who has the best matchmaking skills, so it really is fun for the whole group. It has an insanely good rating on the App Store, which is rare for a dating app. 
Yes, Zoosk is aimed at those people who aren’t really sure what they want and are looking for. By stating your preferences and what you like, Zoosk helps you find your matches that would be ideal for you. A clean layout, practicality, and ease of use are the three best things about Zoosk. If you haven’t had any luck in other dating apps, this one might just change that.
Apps like Tinder and Bumble are technically for all sexual orientations — so why are they still giving you male matches when you've specified you only want women? Swiping through all of that is way too much work, and it shouldn't have to be like that. LESBIANS EXIST. Claiming to the be the app that "introduces you to every lesbian you've ever wanted to meet," HER is the award-winning mix of dating and social media that lets you meet girls you know are girls, as it requires a Facebook for signup and is solely for lesbian, bisexual, and queer women. It was also created by queer women, for queer women, which is glorious. 
“Women do exactly the same things guys do,” said Matt, 26, who works in a New York art gallery. “I’ve had girls sleep with me off OkCupid and then just ghost me”—that is, disappear, in a digital sense, not returning texts. “They play the game the exact same way. They have a bunch of people going at the same time—they’re fielding their options. They’re always looking for somebody better, who has a better job or more money.” A few young women admitted to me that they use dating apps as a way to get free meals. “I call it Tinder food stamps,” one said.
There's wiggle room here, and every user will have a different idea of the ideal time to progress from Tinder conversation to an IRL date. However, it's not out-of-place to ask for a date within a day or two of chatting, or even an hour or two if things are going brilliantly. If you're really hitting it off and you've had a great conversation, it's fine to say something like, "You seem really cool! Would you like to grab a drink sometime?"
Interested in Jewish dating? Then odds are you've heard of Jdate, a Jewish matchmaking site that turned 20 in 2018. The site pre-dates the rise of dating apps, but in recent years they've joined the smartphone revolution and now you can seek marriage-minded Jewish singles in the Jdate app. For Jewish men and women seeking serious relationships, it's a great place to start.
The gist: Claiming to the be the app that "introduces you to every lesbian you've ever wanted to meet," HER is the award-winning mix of dating and social media that lets you meet girls you know are girls, as it requires a Facebook account for signup and is solely for lesbian, bisexual, and queer women.  Language is inclusive — it's not a lesbian site aimed at a male fantasy — and they'll help you widen your dating pool beyond the circles you already know IRL.

Most dating apps are fairly LGBTQ inclusive. Still, it's nice to have an app to call your own. Her is tailored to lesbian, bisexual and queer women. The app serves a valuable purpose, but generally has some bugs and glitches that made it frustrating for me to use. Most of my queer female friends have told me they found the app to be just OK, but they usually end up back on Tinder or Bumble. Still I checked it regularly for some time and had a few pleasant conversations with actual human beings. And isn't that all we're really looking for in a dating app?

In March 2014, Media & Internet conglomerate IAC increased its majority stake in Tinder, a move that caused speculation that the valuation of Tinder was at several billion dollars.[16] In July 2015, Bank of America Merrill Lynch valued Tinder at $1.35 billion, based upon an estimate of $27 per user on an estimated user base of 50 million, with an additional bullish-estimate of $3 billion by taking the average of the IPOs of similar companies. Analysts also estimated that Tinder had about half a million paid users within its userbase that consisted mostly of free users.[57] The monetization of the site has come through leaving the basic app free, and then adding different in-app purchase options for additional functions.[13] In January 2015 Tinder acquired Chill, the developers of Tappy—a mobile messenger that uses "images and ephemerality".[58]


You can find all kinds of studies online that have statistics about how many people want to be in a relationship and/or get married and how many people don’t. The main point is the people who don’t have just as much of a right to find what and who they’re looking for. They have sex on their minds, and there’s nothing wrong with that. The 13 hookup apps on this list have your back!

Now hold on there a minute. “Short-term mating strategies” seem to work for plenty of women too; some don’t want to be in committed relationships, either, particularly those in their 20s who are focusing on their education and launching careers. Alex the Wall Streeter is overly optimistic when he assumes that every woman he sleeps with would “turn the tables” and date him seriously if she could. And yet, his assumption may be a sign of the more “sinister” thing he references, the big fish swimming underneath the ice: “For young women the problem in navigating sexuality and relationships is still gender inequality,” says Elizabeth Armstrong, a professor of sociology at the University of Michigan who specializes in sexuality and gender. “Young women complain that young men still have the power to decide when something is going to be serious and when something is not—they can go, ‘She’s girlfriend material, she’s hookup material.’ … There is still a pervasive double standard. We need to puzzle out why women have made more strides in the public arena than in the private arena.”
The gist: Grindr is the world's biggest social networking app for gay, bi, trans, and queer people, helping singles get it on since 2009. Because there aren't a ton of women on it, it's usually known as the app for gay men — and at 3.6 million daily users, you could say it's hella popular. Though it's kind of pegged as a hookup app, finding a lasting relationship on here isn't impossible by any means. Just keep in mind that many users you'll come across aren't looking for anything serious. 
By November of 2013, Tinder’s largest international markets were Brazil and the United Kingdom, each of which was growing at around 2% per day and had added over a million users each in the previous two months alone. According to Rad, once the company sees sustained organic adoption of Tinder in a new market, they proceed to augment that growth with the help of “borderline celebrities” who have large networks of influence. Essentially the company would reach out to power users on social networks to get them on the site and promoting their presence on it. Minor celebrities from Miss America to Olympic athletes have all been quoted as using the app in the press, which drives buzz and additional user growth. [30] This has been the company’s strategy in the US, and they’ve managed to successfully replicate it in international markets as well. In Turkey, Tinder also briefly experimented with Facebook ads, but they found that growth stagnated at around 25,000 users and, as Mateen says, “The quality of users was completely different. The growth there was horrendous compared to anywhere else.” [22] Yet after implementing their established “borderline celebrity” method, growth in Turkey picked up as well. According to App Annie, as of February 2015, Tinder was ranked among the top 100 overall Android apps in 23 countries and among the top 100 iOS apps in 44 countries. Furthermore, among Android Lifestyle apps, Tinder ranked in the top 100 for 62 countries, the top 10 for 41 countries, and the top 5 for 35 countries. Among iOS Lifestyle apps, Tinder ranked among the top 100 for 139 countries, the top 10 for 82 countries, and the top 5 for 56 countries. Tinder was the #1 Android Lifestyle app in Belgium, the UK, Switzerland, France, the United States, Hungary, Chile, and the Philippines, and the #1 iOS Lifestyle app in Latvia, Malta, Belgium, Brazil, Lithuania, Iceland, Estonia, Sweden, and Finland.
Whether you like it or not, dating apps are completely taking over our world. Never before has hopping online to find a fling or a forever partner been so widely socially acceptable. So the big question is, what are the best dating apps out there besides Tinder, and which one(s) should you sign up to? Maybe you’re interested in the best dating apps for relationships. Maybe you’re looking for dating apps like Tinder that can just be used for hookups. You probably also have questions about free or paid dating apps, or what platform they are available on. Regardless of what you are looking for, I’ve got you covered. Let’s take a look at the very best dating apps going into 2019.

The cool features of this app make it place on the list of Best Hookup Apps Free. If you are looking for some crazy and cool app for one night stand, then this app can be a right choice for you. This app is new, so maybe you didn’t hear much about this app. The most outstanding feature of this app which distinguishes it from other dating app is its privacy control.
Happn is a dating app not too dissimilar from craiglist’s “missed connections.” The app only shows users people they’ve crossed paths with, literally, whether that be on the street, at a party, or in their favorite cafe. Once users find people (or the person) they’re interested in, they have the option to “like” their profile and wait to see if it’s a match.
Pure offers a short window for chatting, deleting conversations and photos exchanged between users an hour after they've been sent. That means you spend more time getting busy and less time exchanging niceties. It is overtly branded as a hookup app, so you know the intentions of whoever you're chatting with without having to play the guessing game. Not only does this app protect your anonymity by making messages and images self-destruct, but it's also free to download. Talk about a win-win.
Catering to straight, gay, and bisexual people, OkCupid is a free dating app that’s beloved by online dating fans. Ideal for people who embrace all kinds of lifestyles, OkCupid is great for making friends or making a date. The app is very popular, ensuring that you have a large group of people to choose from. Unlike some other free dating apps, it’s easy to see when someone was last active on the service. That’s great news for anyone who is tired of dating sites where you send out message after message, and never get a response.
Paid subscription broadens the matching library with members of other dating networks, such as Tinder, Twoo, OKCupid, Match.com, Out Time and others. This will enlarge chances for a happy match. Of course, there are no guarantees, but nobody can cancel the Probability theory, so it’s a good chance. On the other hand, other paid features, such as the Compatibility test are rather childish. Maybe, there are people who need something like this for more confidence, but not for such a high price.
OkCupid is one of the most popular dating apps out there. You've probably heard of this one before. It boasts over 40 million people although we're not sure how many of those are daily active users. It uses a more traditional dating site method. It'll ask you a bunch of questions and try to find matches based on similar interests. It also has some more modern dating apps features, like swiping away profiles you want or don't want. It'll ask you to subscribe to a monthly payment plan to unlock all the good features. The app has some strict, ambiguous rules about some things and the app itself is occasionally slow and buggy. Otherwise, it's actually not half bad.
A: Happy Valentine’s Day! Welcome to the delightful (and sometimes horrifying) world of dating apps. Flirting from your phone can be fun, as well as alluringly convenient—make a match on your morning commute!—but it’s also work. It takes time and effort to sort through the crowd to find someone you want to get a drink with, and you’re certain to face disappointments along the way. The process also inherently requires sharing personal information with strangers, who may screenshot your photos or try to find you on other sites like LinkedIn and Facebook without your consent. Here’s what you should know before you start swiping.
×