2 Stars (I don't like it.): The product is not exactly as described, either appearance-wise or functionally. The product may still be usable but it’s very different to what was described. The product may have a few faults. I'm not a fan of this item as it is no where close to my expectations and I won't order it again, but I can imagine a few others might find it functional as it has at least one positive quality.
Plenty of Fish is an online match-making app for singles with very active user database. They get about 3000000+ daily active users. P.O.F is pretty popular around the globe and hence they’ve 9 different languages for their huge audience. You can get started with P.O.F without having to authenticate with Facebook account, making it a Tinder like app. The text messaging is completely free, you don’t don’t have to pay just for messaging people.
Features: Zoosk is available as an app or on a desktop and requires a paid subscription to unlock key features. With various browsing options, it uses behavioral matchmaking to learn about the user and connect them with SmartPick matches. Features like Zoosk coins can be used to send virtual gifts, and millions of users mean there is always someone available to chat to.
Why? I am 39 and I know how hard it is to meet people. The reason I prefer Tinder is mainly due to volume. You will find more people on there than any other app or site, at least in my city. Tinder is also great when traveling. I’ve made some romantic connections as well as friends that I still communicate with. I have used Bumble, OKCupid, and Hinge and I found myself deleting these apps after a month.
The gist: Since Tinder completely flipped the world of online dating upside down in 2014, numerous apps have tried to compete and give them a leg up on the powerhouse — but to no avail. That is, until Happn came along. Happn uses your current location to alert you of other users nearby, so if you're too scared to talk to a random cutie on the train, Happn can help you match with them and tip you off to other singles who are nearby. (No, really — one of my friends literally watched a guy next to her on the train "like" her on Happn. It's a thing.)
One thing to note if you don't fall into the cis-hetero dating pool: While most of the apps reviewed here are inclusive, there are those that are friendlier to the LGBTQ community than others. For example, OkCupid goes beyond forcing users to choose between being a male or female, including options like Hijra, genderfluid, and two-spirit. If you're a man seeking a man or a woman seeking a woman, you'll want to steer clear of eharmony: It doesn't even give you the option of a same-sex match.
Blendr is a mix between a dating app and a location-based people meeting app. How it works is that the app pays attention to where you are. It'll show you people's profiles based on whether or not you pass by them during the course of your average day. Like most, the app has its flaws and its pay walls aren't very appealing. It does have a ton of people using the service so it shouldn't be too difficult to find people who aren't bots. There are bots, though, so keep that in mind. It works pretty well and it's a good way to find people while doing stuff over the course of your average day.
Hinge is kind of like Tinder. OK, it’s a lot like Tinder — but with a few key differences that make it better. Interface-wise, it looks like Tinder’s younger sister. But function-wise, it relies more on your Facebook friends to make connections for you. Hinge connects you through friends-of-friends-of-friends and shows you not just the people you have in common, but all the interests you have in common. It does this by having you answer a bunch of questions through a Tinder-like interface. Have you been to Berlin? Swipe right. Don’t play croquet? Swipe left. This makes answering questions far easier and less time-consuming, not to mention more fun. The questions themselves aren’t as asinine as those in some other dating apps, and give you a better sense of someone than 500 characters might.
For starters, it's a great app. All the features are perfect for a dating app. Swipe left and right feature, search usernames, search by every aspect you can think of about a person, you can message anyone, see who viewed you, add favorites... But the people on there make it hell if your actually serious about dating. The girls are extremely shallow for the most part and never reply and from most girls profile descriptions, guys are just messaging like crazy looking for sex. Therefore, guys that are serious get looked over because the girls inbox gets blown up by dogs just asking for sex and talking about their private parts.
Why? I met my now-fiancé on Bumble. I liked that I had the power to choose who I talked to. I was tired of getting cornered by creepy men at bars who wouldn't take a hint, but I was too nice to just walk away. (In hindsight, I should have!) Bumble allowed me to never feel obligated to talk to anyone just because they initiated a conversation with me.
In February 2014, security researchers in New York found a flaw which made it possible to find users' precise locations for between 40 and 165 days, without any public notice from the company. Tinder's spokesperson, Rosette Pambakian, said the issue was resolved within 48 hours. Chief Executive Officer Sean Rad said in a statement that Tinder implemented specific measures to enhance location security and further obscure location data shortly after being contacted, and that users' privacy and security continue to be the highest priority.
My first insight into the variety of POF features was successful enough: everything is on the fingertips and can be found easily. The developers paid particular attention to the super simple conversation menu, by the way, all the key features are available for free. It is considered the possibility for new conversation within first 24 hours after signing up increases 2.7x. Well, I managed to start 7. The latest POF version includes the following tools:
As others applications, dating apps can have breaches: hackers have revealed security issues on Tinder[16], Coffee Meets Bagel[17] or Adult FriendFinder for instance. On the last one, the data of more than 412 million users was exposed, one of the largest leak in terms of the number of accounts exposed[18]. In 2016, the sharing of personnal informations from almost 40 millions users of Ashley Madison by a group of Hackers, the "Impact Team", revealed their real name, phone number, email adress, geographical position and sexual preferences[19]. Ashley Madison assured their more than 35 million users that the service was totally "anonymous" and "100% discret" but they didn't delete completely accounts when users chose to (and paid for that) or recognize that data had actually leaked in a first time. Some suicides have been reported after the leak[20].

Match has a free version, but the general consensus is that you need a paid subscription to have any luck on it. That's a hangover from the early days of online dating, when paying for membership to a site meant you were serious about settling down. But my friends and I have long since come to the conclusion that you might be a little too eager to find a significant other if you're paying to get dates, particularly given the abundance of free dating apps. There are definitely paid features on some dating apps that are worth the price, but I've yet to be able to justify shelling out cash for love. 
“Guys view everything as a competition,” he elaborates with his deep, reassuring voice. “Who’s slept with the best, hottest girls?” With these dating apps, he says, “you’re always sort of prowling. You could talk to two or three girls at a bar and pick the best one, or you can swipe a couple hundred people a day—the sample size is so much larger. It’s setting up two or three Tinder dates a week and, chances are, sleeping with all of them, so you could rack up 100 girls you’ve slept with in a year.”

“And it’s just like, waking up in beds, I don’t even remember getting there, and having to get drunk to have a conversation with this person because we both know why we’re there but we have to go through these motions to get out of it. That’s a personal struggle, I guess, but online dating makes it happen that much more. Whereas I would just be sitting at home and playing guitar, now it’s ba-ding”—he makes the chirpy alert sound of a Tinder match—“and … ” He pauses, as if disgusted. “ … I’m fucking.”
The stupendous Blendr app is a modern hookup, designed with the purpose to let it users discover new people near them. The Blendr app uses the GPS function to find a match for you. It locates people in a radius of 1 km. It is not like the other dating app where you have to share your social media accounts details. Now if you want to use this app, download it, and then log in with name and upload your pic. You can use a fake name or fake picture too.
Bumble looks eerily similar to Tinder, but functions a tad differently. The big catch with Bumble is that when opposite genders match, the woman must message the guy first — and she has 24 hours to do so. Guys can extend matches for 24 hours, if they’re really hoping to hear from a woman, as can ladies, if they want to initiate something with a match but just haven’t had the time during the first day. For same-gender matches, either person can initiate the conversation first.
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