First things first: OkCupid and its user base is pretty liberal (which can also translate into "sex positive"). The ads with same-sex couples are an obvious giveaway, but OkCupid has snuck in other little features to weed out more conservative-minded people. For instance, they'll ask questions about whether you're for or against the defunding of Planned Parenthood or same sex marriage, and if you feel obligated to help fellow human beings — all as a way to tell right off the bat if your potential match leans left or right. (This can help you avoid awkward date conversations in the future.) Liberal ladies found that this worked to their advantage, as OkCupid released statistics showing that liberal-leaning answers to those questions made you 80% more likely to find love on the site. Other sites don't go into this type of stuff much past religion, but with politics being more of a hot topic now than ever, you can imagine how torturous it would be to end up with someone who starts an argument with you every time the news is on.
I was also disappointed in the notifications, which were a tad too pushy and out of touch for my taste. CMB was constantly "gently" reminding me to message users I'd matched with and I found myself disabling the app after I received a notification from it that said, "Show [Match Name] who's boss and break the ice today!" Is it just me or is it weird to imply that a potential future relationship should have a hierarchical power dynamic? At the end of the day, I have friends who've had good matches on CMB, but it isn't my favorite app. 
The format is simple. Each featured dater takes part in a question-and-answer livestream on the first night, where they introduce themselves and take questions from the viewing contestants. The next night sees the games begin, and the contestants are asked a series of multiple choice questions about the night before. Players who get all the questions right go on to the next round, where they’re asked a number of questions by the featured dater — who then narrows the field down to three contestants, based on their answers. Those final three choices then get the chance to impress their prospective date via live video by doing whatever it is they do best — whether that’s by busting some killer dance moves, telling jokes, or some other talent. The pair will then go on a date paid for by Quiz Date Live, which can range from hit Broadway shows, Michelin-star dining experiences, helicopter rides over Manhattan, or other luxurious dates.
Why it's awesome: hater is a hilarious concept that started out on Shark Tank (as a half joke, I might add) that might actually work. Rather than being paired up over shared interests or mutual physical attraction, the app simply matches you with people who hate the same things as you — because the bond over disliking something super specific is way stronger. In the words of Mashable's Cassie Murdoch, it "lets you drop that idealized, perky version of yourself you’ve been putting in all your profiles and lets you show off your inner crank instead."
Dating apps also allow users to import their Facebook photos. Don’t include the same picture you use as your Facebook profile image in your dating profile. Again, doing so makes it too easy for someone to find your profile on the social network. Some apps, like Tinder, allow you to fully integrate your Instagram account, letting potential matches check out your entire profile. If your Instagram isn’t particularly private, go ahead and share as you please. But keep in mind that friends and family, whose photos may be on your Instagram, might not necessarily be comfortable being seen by strangers as part of your dating activity. At the very least, before you link your Insta to a dating app, review everything you’ve posted—you might find a particularly intimate or revealing upload you forgot about.
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