Tinder has become one of the best places for people looking to date, hook up, find a long-term relationship, or simply see what kind of interesting people might be in their area. Online dating sites have been waning in favor of dating apps for some time now, and Tinder has cornered such a large portion of the dating app market that. For many young people, the very name of the brand and its functions have become synonymous with dating – you’re likely to hear young singles saying “I’m back on Tinder again!” as a shorthand for their relationship status, and “I’d swipe right!” used as a widely-understood idiom for finding someone attractive.
So I work in the telecom industry. I won't praise or blame the companies that I have worked for over the past 20+ years. To me it's just a job. But what I can tell is that the idea that the American public is getting dupped into paying higher prices due to uncompetitive practices is a bit of a dubious claim. To illustrate let's talk a little history. In 1999 I sold a fiber optic connection for a fortune 500 company. The cost for the 135Mbps port was around $50K a month. The cost of the physical fiber connection itself was another $5K a month. Plus, this was an optical handoff, which means the customer had to be in possesion of very expensive hardware in order to convert that optical handoff to electrical. That hardware typically cost anywhere from $50-$100K. Yikes! A whole lot of money for connection that todays standard would be considered 'meh'. Now, compare that to recent times, say about 3 or 4 years ago, that same connection would cost aroud $2-3K a month and would not require any expensive hardware to convert the signal because most telco companies offer a Ethernet handoff for free. And I would wager that since time the cost has come down even more. So tell me again how uncompeitive the telcom space is?

Most dating apps have both a free and paid version. Choosing not to shell out for the paid membership option won’t stop you from meeting the partner of your dreams. Most of the perks offered—such as the ability to swipe right on an unlimited number of potential matches—only make a difference for the heaviest power users. If you find a service you really like and want to see what additional features could do for you, don’t let me stop you. But when you’re first starting out, it can often be more helpful to try different apps to see what works—rather than financially committing to one option. Plus, dating apps can get expensive: Bumble’s paid tier costs up to $24.99 a month, whereas Tinder’s starts at $9.99 for users under 30 and $19.99 for anyone older.

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